High Halstow Community Site

 

Village Appraisal

Introduction

The appraisal has become a very useful time to place a yardstick in the ground and determine where we have come from, what we have in hand and where we want to go, personally and as a community Some of this has been effected in this parish with the assistance of the parish appraisal, and […] Read more

The Parish of High Halstow

The name is Saxon held to signify Holy Place, first being called Hagelstowe in other records as Hagelsto and as Agelstow. The name High Halstow was brought into being by the amalgamation of the four hamlets in the area, being Clinch Street, Fenn Street, Sharnal Street and High Halstow Street. Fenn Street being lost in […] Read more

Our Village

The village is set on the highest point of the Northern ridge {the Hoo Peninsula} it has a wide variety of scenery within its boundaries. It can be approached in any four directions by road, but of these only two give an impression of its true flavour. The narrow, twisting road through the orchards from […] Read more

Geography

At approximately 170 feet above sea level, High Halstow is one of the highest points on the Hoo Peninsula. The Romans have been credited with the first two attempts at building a sea wall. The subsequent draining of the marshes had a two-fold benefit in that pastureland was created which supported the hardy sheep and […] Read more

Road Names

In continuing the history of the village it seemed fitting to explain the origins of the names of roads within High Halstow Britannia Road This was named after a public house situated near the junction of Clinch Street and what for many years was known as Fenn Road. The public house, was a coaching inn […] Read more

Farming

As in most parts of the country farming in and around High Halstow has changed a great deal over the years. There was a time when a great variety of fruit crops were grown on the local farms, providing work for village women and men alike. Cherry orchards, apples, pears, blackcurrants, gooseberries and strawberries were […] Read more

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